Gradcam 
 
D-Light Studios is happy to announce Dutch artist Martijn Tellinga’s solo exhibition ‘presence (Un) presence’.

We warmly invite you to visit at your own convenience during opening hours October 5-11, daily 4 – 8pm. Free Admission, All Welcome.

With performers Francis Fay, Isabella Oberländer, Ben Sullivan, Claire Keating.

Address: D-Light studios 46 North Great Clarence Street, Dublin 1 D01 K2Y1

www.martijntellinga.nl | www.d-lightstudios.com/presence-un-presence

Tellinga’s evolving durational installation project traces the increasingly blurred distinction between our physical real and a simulated technological reality. Fusing site, movement, video technology and the human senses, the piece stages a radically slowed-down choreography for 4 performers who scan our fundamental postures —standing, walking, sitting, lying down— as the means to negotiate a heavily medialised installation environment. The performances become gradually expanded and displaced through non-linear video feeds, image transmission and occasional text mediation on large-size canvases mounted in the space. While subject of perpetual broadcast, the postures slowly take shape as still acts of resistance, protesting the never-ceasing scrambling of their time and location and quietly (re)enacting the relational space the performers share between them.

‘Martijn Tellinga’s “presence (Un) presence” employs

forms of slow encounter in an effort to make us pause and experience a

passing present in all its heterogeneity and difference. This work acts and reacts, calls and responds, it folds time upon itself, it persists, it continues. It reminds

 us that we are affective bodies, constantly pulsing with waves, evolving

and creating new energies as we react and interact with other bodies’

—from Mark Garry’s written response ‘I am listening to you’

The artistic practice of Martijn Tellinga occupies an intermedium between spatial installation, music, and durational performance. Drawn from a reduced formalist-seeming vocabulary, it engages site, sound, moving image, choreography, the temporal and the textual. Exploring processual dynamics and open-form composition processes, he seeks to address questions of place, agency and environment from within evolving exhibition settings. He presents worldwide, lectures and works in residence. He is one of the curator producers of the long running series DNK Amsterdam. With DNK Ensemble he interprets and re-enacts seminal pieces on the edge of experimental music and performance art. He lives between Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Dublin, Ireland.

Generously supported by the Irish Arts Council, Dutch Mondriaan Fonds and TU Dublin (MSCA RISE Nest).

Perspectives: Artistic Practice and Research (Online Event)

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Friday 24th September 2021

IMBAS and Solstice Arts Centre host a one-day, online gathering of artists and scholars to explore the relationship between research and artistic practice. Supporting the development of a community of artists and arts practice researchers within and beyond academic institutions, the event is funded under the Irish Research Council New Foundations 2020 scheme. This event will include presentations by Danny McCarthy, Lisa McLoughlin, Wayne Jordan, Kathleen Turner, Brian Fay and Tríona Ní Shíocháin.

Booking  Free booking is available on the link below

https://solsticeartscentre.ticketsolve.com/shows/873620625?_ga=2.88186011.1033095077.1631788718-1693719818.1631352424

Solstice Arts Centre supports an ethos of equal opportunity that is multi-generational, multi-cultural, and multi-art. Its core values include participation, engagement and creativity, resonant with the UN sustainable development goals of wellbeing, quality, equality, sustainability and partnership.

IMBAS is an Irish forum for artists and scholars working within and beyond the University sector who share an interest in arts practice research, particularly in the performing arts. IMBAS facilitates communication between institutions and individuals, promoting scholarly discourse and modes of practice concerning knowledge creation through performance and performance-related creative practice. Click here to visit the IMBAS website.

The event includes the launch of a new publication, The Artist and Academia (Routledge 2021), edited by Helen Phelan and Graham F. Welch.

Schedule

Panel Session 1: 11am – 12.30pm
Three, 20-minute presentations and 30-minute Q’n’A.
Presenters: Kathleen Turner, Wayne Jordan, Lisa McLoughlin
Chair: Aileen Dillane

Book Launch: 12.30 – 1pm
The Artist and Academia (Edited by Helen Phelan and Graham F. Welch)

Panel Session 2: 2pm – 3.30pm
Three, 20-minute presentations and 30-minute Q’n’A.
Presenters: Danny McCarthy, Brian Fay, Tríona Ní Shíocháin
Chair: Belinda Quirke

Roundtable Discussion: 3.40 – 5pm
Short responses to the panel presentations, followed by open discussion with all contributors and seminar attendees.

This is a free event but booking is required. If you are in the position to support us, we kindly ask for a donation.

Perspectives: Artistic Practice and Research (Online Event)

b98518fad5e3f8aa2fe7a76340e2bb1dc178ff7ee53fb600d103ac77dc89e7dd

Friday 24th of September 2021

IMBAS and Solstice Arts Centre host a one-day, online gathering of artists and scholars to explore the relationship between research and artistic practice. Supporting the development of a community of artists and arts practice researchers within and beyond academic institutions, the event is funded under the Irish Research Council New Foundations 2020 scheme. 

This event will include presentations by Danny McCarthy, Lisa McLoughlin, Wayne Jordan, Kathleen Turner, Brian Fay and Tríona Ní Shíocháin.

Booking  Free booking is available on the link below

https://solsticeartscentre.ticketsolve.com/shows/873620625?_ga=2.88186011.1033095077.1631788718-1693719818.1631352424

Solstice Arts Centre supports an ethos of equal opportunity that is multi-generational, multi-cultural, and multi-art. Its core values include participation, engagement and creativity, resonant with the UN sustainable development goals of wellbeing, quality, equality, sustainability and partnership.

IMBAS is an Irish forum for artists and scholars working within and beyond the University sector who share an interest in arts practice research, particularly in the performing arts. IMBAS facilitates communication between institutions and individuals, promoting scholarly discourse and modes of practice concerning knowledge creation through performance and performance-related creative practice. Click here to visit the IMBAS website.

The event includes the launch of a new publication, The Artist and Academia (Routledge 2021), edited by Helen Phelan and Graham F. Welch.

Schedule

Panel Session 1: 11am – 12.30pm
Three, 20-minute presentations and 30-minute Q’n’A.
Presenters: Kathleen Turner, Wayne Jordan, Lisa McLoughlin
Chair: Aileen Dillane

Book Launch: 12.30 – 1pm
The Artist and Academia (Edited by Helen Phelan and Graham F. Welch)

Panel Session 2: 2pm – 3.30pm
Three, 20-minute presentations and 30-minute Q’n’A.
Presenters: Danny McCarthy, Brian Fay, Tríona Ní Shíocháin
Chair: Belinda Quirke

Roundtable Discussion: 3.40 – 5pm
Short responses to the panel presentations, followed by open discussion with all contributors and seminar attendees.

This is a free event but booking is required. If you are in the position to support us, we kindly ask for a donation.

 

GradCAM at the Pavilion of Ireland at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia
Representation of the Irish Pavilion, central section in the Arsenale. Built using burnt server cabinets, fans, thermal cameras, screens, grow lights and rubber plants the pavilion performs the material impact of data infrastructure on everyday life. © ANNEX

Representation of the Irish Pavilion, central section in the Arsenale.
Built using burnt server cabinets, fans, thermal cameras, screens, grow lights and rubber plants the pavilion performs
the material impact of data infrastructure on everyday life. © ANNEX

The 2021 Irish Pavilion exhibition, Entanglement, at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, will explore the materiality of data, and the interwoven human, environmental and cultural impacts of communication technologies. The exhibition will highlight how data production and consumption territorialize the physical landscape, and examine Ireland’s place in the pan-national evolution of data infrastructure.

 

The 2021 Irish Pavilion exhibition, Entanglement, at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition of LaBiennale di Venezia, will explore the materiality of data, and the interwoven human, environmental andcultural impacts of communication technologies. The exhibition will highlight how data production andconsumption territorialize the physical landscape, and examine Ireland’s place in the pan-national evolutionof data infrastructure.

Ireland at Venice is an initiative of Culture Ireland in partnership with the Arts Council and the exhibition in2021 will be curated by Annex, a collective of architects, artists, and urbanists. Entanglement responds to thetheme selected by the curators of the Biennale Architettura 2021, How will we live together? The exhibitionaims to raise awareness about the materiality of the global internet and Cloud services, which is interwovenwith the Irish landscape – made manifest through the vast constellation of data centres, fibre optic cablenetworks, and energy grids that have come to populate its cities and suburbs over recent decades.

Ireland plays a significant historical role in the evolution of global communications and data infrastructure.In 1866, the world’s first commercially successful transatlantic telegraph cable landed on the West coast ofIreland. In 1901, the inventor of the radio Guglielmo Marconi transmitted some of the world’s first wirelessradio messages from Ireland across the Atlantic Ocean to Newfoundland. Today, Dublin has overtakenLondon as the data centre hub of Europe, hosting 25% of all available European server space. And by theyear 2027, data centres are forecast to consume a third of Ireland’s total electricity demand.

Entanglement draws from both contemporary and historical data storage artefacts as building blocks to formthe structure of the pavilion. These artefacts are assembled in a campfire formation, referencing thisprimitive architectural space where early human civilisations formed alliances, built social networks andeventually developed complex societies. The pavilion asserts that from the burning of campfire logs to themanagement of waste heat generated by contemporary data infrastructure, the production and distributionof information is intrinsically connected to the production and distribution of heat.

By foregrounding these thermodynamic processes as a link between the architectures of the campfire andthe data centre, the pavilion speculates on the relationship between these forms and how diversecommunities converge around them in the past and into the future. Entanglement invites its audience toexperience this thermal logic themselves through real-time thermographic imaging technologies thatjuxtapose key sites associated with data infrastructure in Ireland with traces of human activity in theArsenale.

Drone thermographic image of agricultural land in Ireland, highlighting the heat generated from data infrastructure. © ANNEX

Drone thermographic image of agricultural land in Ireland, highlighting the heat generated from data infrastructure.
© ANNEX

These complex series of energy-intensive thermal transformations in the pavilion presents an immersive andperformative visitor experience from illustrating the extent to which people are producing, consuming anddisseminating data across the globe, to bringing transparency to the local and planetary scale of datainfrastructure networks; for example, how a Facebook ‘like’ in Malaysia can trigger the emission of heatfrom a server on the outskirts of Dublin.

From top left to right, Donal Lally (GradCAM), Alan Butler (artist) , Clare Lyster (Illinois University), Sven Anderson (GradCAM), David Capener (GradCAM) and Fiona McDermott (Trinity College)

From top left to right, Donal Lally (GradCAM), Alan Butler (artist) , Clare Lyster (Illinois University), Sven Anderson (GradCAM), David Capener (GradCAM) and Fiona McDermott (Trinity College)

Annex is an international multidisciplinary research and design collective, comprised of a core team ofarchitects, artists, and urbanists, whose work operates between and beyond the subject areas of computerscience, gaming platforms, technology and public space, data centres, sensor technology, and large technicalsystems. Members include Sven Anderson, Alan Butler, David Capener, Donal Lally, Clare Lyster and FionaMcDermott.

Ireland at Venice is an initiative of Culture Ireland in partnership with the Arts Council and in 2021 thepavilion also has the support of: The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media;Royal Institute of Architects Ireland; TU Dublin School of Creative Arts; TU Dublin Graduate School ofCreative Arts and Media; Trinity College Dublin; CONNECT Research Centre for Future Networks andCommunications; University of Illinois at Chicago, Creative Activity Award; Valentia Slate, ARUP, Office ofPublic Works and Green on Red Gallery.

Irish Pavilion Sponsors

Irish Pavilion Sponsors

New Industrial World Conference 2020 (ENMI) _REAL SMART CITIES

Robot and human hand

 

New Industrial World Conference 2020 (ENMI)

22 & 23 December

In memory of Bernard Stiegler. 

The New Industrial World Conference (ENMI) is supported by the Real Smart Cities Project and organised by  the Institute of Research and Innovation (IRI)  at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. This year’s topic is Taking care of Computing and Generations.
Before his death on August 5, 2020, Bernard Stiegler planned the organization of the 2020 New Industrial World Conference around issues of computing and generations. During this conference, we will continue the work started around these questions, by relying on the texts of Bernard Stiegler and on the work of the speakers.

 Following the health measures decreed by the French government, the New Industrial World Conference will be held entirely online on Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 23 December. Please register before 21st December on this site.

The Archive of Everyday Life

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The smartphone gathers real-time information while simultaneously archiving, processing and representing that information to me. This is the automatic-everyday where we are sold the myth that our digital prostheses are opening out a world of possibilities when in fact, according to a specific and ever-changing grid of algorithmic governance, they are closing it down. The previously unimaginable changes in speed created by planetary computation, the new technologies of real-time digital tertiary retention have caused a disruption to take place in the very structure of everyday life (which is itself now the mode of production) which has significant implications for spatial production. This is the archive of everyday life.

This archive is not a metaphor it is a material and spatial reality. This archive is vast, cavernous, anonymous looking warehouses filled with seemingly endless aisles of powder coated aluminium cabinets standing to attention, flickering led lights, a cardiograph of data lives — click-like-tweet-porn-share-send-spam-delete — all serenaded by the deafening soundtrack of energy hungry cooling fans.

This archive is human exclusion zones where robots respond to our buy-now-one-click demands, moving objects in the dark, the like of which we never knew we wanted across a military grade infrastructure — orders “fulfilled” by the logistical precariat of digital capitalism.

This archive is Cobalt uploaded from the earth by the hands of child miners in the not so Democratic Republic of Congo, to facilitate the technologies of Tesla Apple, Microsoft, Google and Dell who are currently being sued by International Rights Advocates on behalf of fourteen Congolese families.

The archive is dirty.

The archive is material.

The archive produces space.

Architecture has become the veil of secrecy that digital capitalism needs in order to survive and the currency of this new city is attention.

 Seminar Outline

This online seminar aims to develop a multidisciplinary research community to study the archive as it has been transformed by multi-scalar computational assemblages.  What then are the kinds of spaces being produced by the archive. How, as a research community, might we understand these spaces? Who produces this space? What is it that is being produced? How is it being produced? Why is it being produced? For whom is it being produced? To what extent do these spaces contribute to our ability to participate in the democratic production of space?

Dates Title Presenter
16/10/2020 1 Human, not too human? TBC
23/10/2020 2 The Production of Space David Capener
6/11/2020 3 The Geology of the Archive Dr. Nicole Starosielski (Author of The Undersea Network)
20/11/2020 4 The Data Furnace Donal Lally
4/12/2020 5 If you like that, you’ll love this Samir Bhowmik (Artist) & Guest Presenter TBC
18/12/2020 6 Archive of Everyday life Dr. Robert Porter (Author of Meanderings Through the Politics of Everyday Life)

Reading List: To be supplied on registration.

For enquiries contact: donal.lally@tudublin.ie

April, 2024

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